5 Tips to Remember for Driving Safely in the Rain

5 Tips to Remember for Driving Safely in the Rain

Driving in the rain

Singing in the rain is fun. But driving? For some people, it's anxiety-producing. According to the U.S. Department of Transportation, there are on average more than 950,000 automobile crashes each year due to wet pavement, resulting in approximately 4,700 deaths and 384,000 injuries.

But being behind the wheel and a rain-splattered windshield doesn't have to be a white-knuckled, nerve-racking experience. Brent Praeter, a supervising instructor at D&D Driving School, Inc. and a member of the Driving School Association of the Americas, both in Kettering, Ohio, offers these tips for driving in a downpour:

  1. Think. "Many people drive subconsciously, out of habit," says Praeter. "And when it rains, they often don't adjust their thinking." When conditions are less than ideal, drivers need to stay alert and focused on what's going on around them.
  2. Turn on those headlights. It's the law in all states to turn on headlights when visibility is low, and many states also require having the headlights on when the windshield wipers are in use. Praeter says that well-working wipers and relatively new (not threadbare) tires also are must-haves when driving in rain.
  3. Beware of hydroplaning. That's the technical term for what occurs when your tires are getting more traction on the layer of water on the road than on the road itself—the result is that your car begins to slide uncontrollably. It's easy enough to hydroplane: All you need is one-twelfth of an inch of rain on the road and a speed of more than 35 miles per hour. If you start to hydroplane, let off the accelerator slowly and steer straight until you regain control.
  4. Turn off cruise control. Ironically, on rain- or snow- slick surfaces, cruise control may cause you to lose control. You might think it'll help you stay at one steady speed, but if you hydroplane while you're in cruise control, your car will actually go faster.
  5. Slow down. Speed limit signs are designed for ideal conditions, says Praeter, 'and that means driving when you have little traffic and good visibility." That's hardly the environment you're driving in when it's raining, so let up on the accelerator and allow more time to get to your destination.

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The information in this article was obtained from various sources not associated with State Farm. While we believe it to be reliable and accurate, we do not warrant the accuracy or reliability of the information. These suggestions are not a complete list of every loss control measure. The information is not intended to replace manuals or instructions provided by the manufacturer or the advice of a qualified professional. Nor is it intended to effect coverage under our policy. State Farm makes no guarantees of results from use of this information.