Boat Trailer Safety

Prepare to Launch with Boat Trailer Safety

SUV on a road towing a boat

Your boat is a getaway from the everyday. And your boat trailer gives you the freedom to make that getaway wherever your towing vehicle can take you. Before setting out for your favorite waterway, take a moment to learn a bit more about boat trailer safety.

Choosing your trailer

Towing safety begins by choosing the proper trailer for your boat's weight and size. Most trailers have a capacity plate that lists the Gross Vehicle Weight Rating. This figure will tell you if the trailer is rated to handle the total weight of your boat, motor, fuel and other onboard equipment. Make sure your trailer has a capacity greater than your total load; your load shouldn't exceed 85 percent of the trailer's total capacity.

Also, an ill-fitting trailer can lead to unbalanced loads, as well as hull damage. Choose a trailer that allows your boat's hull to fit snugly on the rollers and other contact points. If you have any questions about fit, discuss them with a qualified dealer.

Finally, you may want to consult the National Marine Manufacturers Association (NMMA) list of certified trailer manufacturers. Trailer designs from listed companies are required to comply with industry standards and federal safety regulations.

Choosing your towing vehicle

As with your trailer, your vehicle and its hitch should be rated to handle the tow load. Check your vehicle owner's manual for towing information. If you have other questions, your vehicle or trailer's manufacturer can help you decide whether your vehicle and its hitch are up to the job.

Hitching it up

The following steps will help make sure your trailer is securely fastened to your vehicle and ready for the road.

  • Distribute gear evenly in the boat for a balanced load.
  • Secure boat tie-downs to ensure that the boat won't shift during transport.
  • Lower the trailer coupler onto the vehicle's hitch ball and lock the safety pin.
  • Connect safety chains in a crisscross 'X' pattern to the frame of the towing vehicle.
  • Connect trailer lighting cable to vehicle.
  • Check that all trailer lights are working.
  • If applicable, test trailer brakes and brake lights.
  • Check for proper vehicle and trailer tire pressure.
  • Check that all fasteners are properly tightened.

Driving safely

Driving with a loaded trailer is special skill, one worth practicing in an empty parking lot and light traffic before taking to the open road. Keep in mind that towing a trailer will reduce acceleration rates, increase braking distances, and make steering and handling less predictable. This means that the risks posed by hazards such as traffic, wind, and hills are all multiplied. Learning how to handle your rig will help ensure that you and your crew enjoy a safe outing, both on land and on water.

Disclosures

State Farm (including State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company and its subsidiaries and affiliates) is not responsible for, and does not endorse or approve, either implicitly or explicitly, the content of any third party sites hyperlinked from this page. State Farm has no discretion to alter, update, or control the content on the hyperlinked, third party site. Access to third party sites is at the user's own risk, is being provided for informational purposes only and is not a solicitation to buy or sell any of the products which may be referenced on such third party sites.

The information in this article was obtained from various sources not associated with State Farm. While we believe it to be reliable and accurate, we do not warrant the accuracy or reliability of the information. These suggestions are not a complete list of every loss control measure. The information is not intended to replace manuals or instructions provided by the manufacturer or the advice of a qualified professional. Nor is it intended to effect coverage under our policy. State Farm makes no guarantees of results from use of this information.