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Boost your home pool safety

Dreaming of a more leisurely, escape-worthy backyard? For many, that dream includes a swimming pool — either above-ground or in-ground — or a hot tub. Plenty of American homeowners already live that dream every day: There are approximately 10 million swimming pools in the country, according to the National Swimming Pool Foundation, and about 7 million hot tubs. (Those statistics don’t include the number of portable pools.)

Swimming pools come with risks. Seventy-four percent of drowning deaths of children younger than 15 occur at a home, and it’s estimated that a child dies every five days in a portable pool in the United States. That’s why any pool — portable, above-ground, in-ground — should be installed and used in tandem with physical safety elements such as a pool safety fence and educational safety elements like safer swimming practices, including lessons for everyone and CPR training.

One step that you can take if you have a more permanent structure is to schedule annual maintenance on your swimming pool. Have a professional inspect the pool, drain covers and any other nearby hazards. Then make sure family and friends that use the pool understand where the pool safety equipment is located and what safety requirements you have for swimming, such as providing adult supervision at all times for children. Many pool accidents occur when adults momentarily step away from the pool area leaving a child unattended.

Need a refresher? Check out the pool safety tips and to-do’s in this graphic.

The information in this article was obtained from various sources not associated with State Farm® (including State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company and its subsidiaries and affiliates). While we believe it to be reliable and accurate, we do not warrant the accuracy or reliability of the information. State Farm is not responsible for, and does not endorse or approve, either implicitly or explicitly, the content of any third party sites that might be hyperlinked from this page. The information is not intended to replace manuals, instructions or information provided by a manufacturer or the advice of a qualified professional, or to affect coverage under any applicable insurance policy. State Farm makes no guarantees of results from use of this information.

The information in this article was obtained from various sources not associated with State Farm®. While we believe it to be reliable and accurate, we do not warrant the accuracy or reliability of the information. These suggestions are not a complete list of every loss control measure. The information is not intended to replace manuals or instructions provided by the manufacturer or the advice of a qualified professional. Nor is it intended to effect coverage under our policy. State Farm makes no guarantees of results from use of this information.




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