Help Your Teen Be a Better Driver

Help Your Teen Be a Better Driver

Dad helps teen be a better driver

Car crashes are the leading cause of death for U.S. teenagers, claiming the lives of more than 2200 each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In fact, driving or riding in a car is the number one threat to your teen's safety.

But you can play an important role in keeping your kids safer behind the wheel. State Farm® offers a variety of free tools and helpful resources, such as Road Trips® and Road Aware®, at the Teen Driver Safety website.

In addition, use these ideas to start the conversation with your teen about risky driving behaviors:

Create a friendly competition

Download the State Farm® Driver Feedback™; app to your smartphone, make sure the volume is off, the phone is placed where it will not distract the driver, and let the driving fun — and education — begin. As you travel, the app measures driving behaviors, including acceleration, braking and cornering, traffic congestion, and the types of roads you drive on. The app gives you a score for the trip, along with helpful suggestions on how to improve your driving on your next trip. Who will get the better score: you or your teen?

Sign an agreement

A teen who has completed a driver's education course knows the basics but lacks experience and doesn't necessarily understand the complexities of everyday driving. Set written guidelines that both you and your teen can refer to, and sign the agreement. Include goals for your teen, as well as penalties for violations. When each goal is achieved — such as remaining incident-free for six months after getting the license — offer positive feedback and increased driving privileges. You can download a parent/teen agreement through the Steer Clear® Driver Discount program, or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers this driving agreement as an example.

Be a good example

A teen will be quick to dismiss the driving rules you put in place if you don't follow the rules yourself. Never talk on the phone, text, use social media, or interact with your phone in any way while driving. Obey the speed limit and keep your emotions in check when you're behind the wheel.

With the encouragement and support of State Farm, Congress has declared the third week of October National Teen Driver Safety Week. Take time to focus on safe driving by getting your family, your teen's school, and your community involved with educating young drivers about safe driving practices. Since the declaration, thousands of communities across the United States have reinforced positive habits like driving 2N2®: 2 eyes on the road and 2 hands on the wheel.

Disclosures

State Farm® (including State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company and its subsidiaries and affiliates) is not responsible for, and does not endorse or approve, either implicitly or explicitly, the content of any third party sites hyperlinked from this page. State Farm has no discretion to alter, update, or control the content on the hyperlinked, third party site. Access to third party sites is at the user's own risk, is being provided for informational purposes only and is not a solicitation to buy or sell any of the products which may be referenced on such third party sites.

The information in this article was obtained from various sources not associated with State Farm™. While we believe it to be reliable and accurate, we do not warrant the accuracy or reliability of the information. These suggestions are not a complete list of every loss control measure. The information is not intended to replace manuals or instructions provided by the manufacturer or the advice of a qualified professional. Nor is it intended to effect coverage under our policy. State Farm makes no guarantees of results from use of this information.